Neonatal Jaundice (Ongoing)

Posted On 2020-10-16 10:48:46



This series on “Neonatal Jaundice” is edited by David K. Stevenson, PhD and Ronald J. Wong, MD, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Its main purposes are to provide a state-of-art review of neonatal jaundice, evidence-based data and expert opinions about how neonatal jaundice should be managed, and a perspective on what therapeutic approaches might be possible in the future.

David K. Stevenson, PhD
Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA

Dr. David K. Stevenson is the Harold K. Faber Professor of Pediatrics and has made many impactful contributions to the field of neonatology and pediatrics, including his seminal studies on neonatal jaun-dice, bilirubin production and heme oxygenase biology. As a neonatologist, his research has focused primarily on neonatal jaundice and more recently on the causes of preterm birth and its prevention. He has held numerous leadership roles at Stanford University School of Medicine, including Vice Dean and Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. He is currently the Senior Associate Dean for Maternal & Child Health, the Co-Director of the Stanford Maternal & Child Health Research Institute, and the Prin-cipal Investigator for the March of Dimes Prematurity Research Center at Stanford University. Dr. Ste-venson has received many awards, including the Virginia Apgar Award, which is the highest award in Perinatal Pediatrics, the Joseph W. St. Geme, Jr. Leadership Award from the Federation of Pediatric Or-ganizations, the Jonas Salk Award for Leadership in Prematurity Prevention from the March of Dimes Foundation, and the John Howland Medal and Award, the highest award in academic pediatrics. He has served as the President of the American Pediatric Society. In recognition of his achievements, Dr. Ste-venson is a member of the National Academy of Medicine.

Ronald J. Wong, MD
Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA

Ronald J Wong is a Senior Research Scientist in the Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine in the Department of Pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine. He has contributed to the field of neonatology with primary research interests in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of neona-tal hyperbilirubinemia through studies investigating the biology of bilirubin and heme oxygenase as well as on the causes of preterm birth and its prevention. He currently serves the Laboratory Director of the Prematurity Research Center at Stanford University.

Series outline:

  1. Epidemiology of Neonatal Jaundice
  2. Genetics of Neonatal Jaundice
  3. Biology of Bilirubin Production and Its Inhibition 
  4. Bilirubin Transport, Uptake, and Excretion
  5. Bilirubin Measurement and Binding
  6. Hemolytic Causes of Jaundice: Diagnosis and Treatment
  7. Neurotoxicity
  8. Phototherapy
  9. Management Guidelines

Disclosure:
The series “Neonatal Jaundice” was commissioned by the editorial office, Pediatric Medicine without any sponsorship or funding. David K. Stevenson and Ronald J. Wong served as the unpaid Guest Editor for the series.