AB021. Relationship between language development and birth conditions of children born premature
Abstract

AB021. Relationship between language development and birth conditions of children born premature

Beatriz Servilha Brocchi

School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Pontifical Catholic University of Campinas, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil

Correspondence to: Beatriz Servilha Brocchi, PhD. School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Pontifical Catholic University of Campinas, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil. Email: beatriz.servilha@puc-campinas.edu.br.

Abstract: Delay in language acquisition is one of the disorders in premature children described in literature. The effects of prematurity, in association with such birth conditions as weight, may be considered a risk factor for the development of children’s language. This study aimed to relate weight, gestational age, and length of hospital stay with the language development of children born premature. Methods: Participants were 28 parents and their children aged 0 to 24 months corrected, with diagnosis of prematurity who were born with weight below 1,500 g and/or gestational age below 33 weeks. The children were evaluated in the post-discharge routine of the same hospital of birth, through the Initial Acquisition Scale of Speech and Language. The protocol, used as a screening instrument for children aged 0 to 36 months, is divided into three categories: auditory-expressive, auditory-receptive, and visual. The evaluation data were related to the variables of weight at birth, gestational age, and length of hospital stay. Findings: The children had, on average, 4.93 months of corrected age (SD =4.30). They presented, on average, a birth weight of 1427 g (SD =551.24), gestational age of 30.93 weeks (SD =2.4), and length of hospital stay of 50.96 days (SD =23.3). More than half of the children achieved the expected performance for age in the auditory-expressive (64.1%) and visual (60%) categories. Half of them presented the same result for auditory-receptive (50%) and overall performance (57.1%). We observed a positive correlation between birth weight and the auditory-expressive category (c=0.462, P=0.013) and overall performance (c=0.378, P=0.047): a higher weight related to better scores in the categories. Meanwhile, a longer hospitalization time related, albeit weakly, to worse test performance. Conclusion: Half of the children showed the expected performance at the corrected age. The weight variable was an intervening birth condition in the language acquisition of preterm infants.

Keywords: Language; preterm children; birth conditions


doi: 10.21037/pm.2020.AB021
Cite this abstract as: Brocchi BS. Relationship between language development and birth conditions of children born premature. Pediatr Med 2020;3:AB021.